Wednesday, June 17, 2015

ExpressingBoston intervention

Last Wednesday at around 10 AM, I installed two vertical wrought iron friezes where once had been tempered safety glass at the Four Corners/Geneva Ave MBTA station in Dorchester. There are approximately six "moments" like this at the station where there is a bench, a small roof, and tiny (17" wide) glass sidelights that would provide a modicum of shelter to a pedestrian. Universally all the glass in the station has been broken, and most of it removed, save the shards of tempered glass stuck to the caulking.

The stations, along the Indigo/Fairmount Line, see only a minimum of use - buses run more frequently and are less expensive that the MBTA. The stations are designed and constructed in a brutalist manner - heavy concrete walls, and galvanized structural steel posts, railings, etc. The reproductions of art from local artists, although laudable, do little to soften the oppressive prison-like architecture of the space.

As part of my nine months as a fellow of the ExpressingBoston Fellowship supported by the Boston Foundation, I repaired one of the small waiting stations by installing forged and welded decorative steel friezes in the frames where the glass had once been. Painted bright yellow, and forming a repetitive and undulating pattern, the frieze stands in joyful opposition to the built surroundings.